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Form 8082: What Does an Administrative Adjustment Request Do for a Business?

Form 8082: What Does an Administrative Adjustment Request Do for a Business?

Ever start a story with “What had happened was…”? This is that in corporate taxes.

Form 8082, also known as the Administrative Adjustment Request (AAR), plays a vital role for businesses, particularly those classified as partnerships. It is closely linked to the partnership audit provisions established under the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015.

The purpose of Form 8082 is to enable partnerships to report items differently than how they were initially reported on the original Form 1065 or Schedule K-1. This allows partnerships to correct errors, inconsistencies, or other adjustments that may affect their income tax return. By submitting an AAR, a partnership can ensure that any necessary adjustments are reflected accurately.

AAR is especially valuable because it acts as a mechanism for addressing issues that arise during a partnership audit. The partnership audit provisions introduced by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 aim to streamline the audit process and hold partnerships accountable for any adjustments needed. This federal tax form helps partnerships navigate this process by providing a means to make administrative adjustments.

Who Files an AAR?

Partnerships that need to make administrative adjustments to their original Form 1065 or Schedule K-1 may file an Administrative Adjustment Request (AAR) using Form 8082. This form is specifically designed to address errors, inconsistencies, or other adjustments that may affect the partnership’s income tax return. It allows partnerships to report items differently than how they were initially reported, ensuring accuracy and compliance with the partnership audit provisions. While individual partners for purposes related to the business may be affected by the adjustments made, it is the partnership as a whole that files the AAR.

Who Should File Form 8082?

Form 8082, also known as the Administrative Adjustment Request, is a form that should be filed by partnerships and their partners. The form is used to correct errors or discrepancies on the U.S. Return of Partnership Income (Form 1065) or the income tax returns of individual partners.

Partnerships that have made errors on their original return or inconsistent treatment of certain items may need to file Form 8082. Additionally, partnerships that have been audited by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and have made netted partnership adjustments must also file this form.

The individuals who should file Form 8082 include reviewed-year partners, pass-through partners, direct partners, and tax-exempt partners. It is important for eligible partnerships to file this form in order to properly report any necessary adjustments and maintain compliance with partnership tax laws.

Filing Form 8082 comes with several benefits. Firstly, it allows partnerships to correct any mistakes or discrepancies in their tax filings. This can help avoid potential penalties or interest charges that may arise from errors. Secondly, it helps ensure that the income tax returns of individual partners accurately reflect the partnership’s adjusted income. Overall, Form 8082 is an important tool for partnerships to rectify any issues and maintain accurate tax reporting.

Benefits of Filing Form 8082

Filing Form 8082, the administrative adjustment request, can provide significant benefits for partnerships that need to correct previous reporting errors or request administrative adjustments. This form allows partnerships to report certain items differently than how they were originally reported on Schedule K-1, Schedule Q, or a foreign trust statement.

By filing Form 8082, partnerships can make corrections to any errors that may have occurred on their original returns, ensuring accurate reporting of income and deductions. This is crucial for compliance with partnership tax laws and avoiding potential penalties or audits.

Moreover, Form 8082 provides a mechanism for requesting administrative adjustments. This means that if a partnership discovers an inconsistency in how certain items were treated, they can use this form to rectify the situation. Correcting discrepancies through administrative adjustments not only helps maintain the partnership’s credibility but also ensures fair and accurate taxation.

In summary, filing Form 8082 offers partnerships the opportunity to correct reporting errors, request administrative adjustments, and ultimately maintain compliance with partnership tax laws. It is an essential tool for ensuring accurate and fair taxation for eligible partnerships.

Preparing to File Form 8082

Before filing Form 8082, partnerships should take steps to ensure that they are ready to make any necessary corrections or administrative adjustments. First, it is important to thoroughly review the U.S. Return of Partnership Income (Form 1065) and the reviewed-year partners’ income tax returns. This will help identify any errors or inconsistencies that need to be addressed. Additionally, partnerships should gather all relevant documentation and records to support the adjustments they plan to make on Form 8082. This includes documentation related to netted partnership adjustments, individual partners’ shares, and any pass-through partner information. It is also essential to understand and comply with specific instructions provided on the form itself, as well as any special rules that may apply to certain partnerships such as tax-exempt organizations, foreign trusts, or real estate mortgage investment conduits (REMICs).

By properly preparing to file Form 8082, partnerships can ensure accurate reporting and avoid potential penalties or audits.

Check Eligibility for Filing Form 8082

To determine eligibility for filing Form 8082, several criteria must be met. This form, also known as the Administrative Adjustment Request, is used to request adjustments to previously filed partnership tax returns. Only certain individuals and entities are eligible to file this form.

Partnerships that have filed a U.S. Return of Partnership Income (Form 1065) and have reviewed-year partners are generally eligible to file Form 8082. Reviewed-year partners refer to those partners whose income tax returns have been audited or adjusted due to the partnership tax return.

However, there are circumstances in which Form 8082 should not be filed. For example, eligible partnerships may not file this form if they have already netted any partnership adjustments on the original return, resulting in no net income tax increase. Additionally, partnerships with income tax return due dates that have not yet passed are not eligible to file Form 8082.

To request an administrative adjustment using Form 8082, certain criteria must be met. This includes having inconsistencies or errors in the treatment of items between the partnership tax return and the individual partner’s return, or if there is a decrease in tax for the partner due to lower-tier BBA partnerships. This form must be filed when there is a discrepancy between the partnership tax return and the individual partner’s return, or if the partner has experienced a decrease in tax due to lower-tier BBA partnerships. Additionally, Form 8082 may be used by partners who have not yet received their Schedules K

Form 8082 is used to request an administrative adjustment for discrepancies between a partnership tax return and the individual partner’s return. The form must be filed if there are inconsistencies or errors in the treatment of items, or if there has been a decrease in tax for the partner due to lower-tier BBA partnerships. This form can also be used by partners who have not yet received their Schedules K

In conclusion, partnerships with reviewed-year partners who have inconsistencies or errors in their income tax returns may be eligible to file Form 8082 to request an administrative adjustment. However, there are circumstances in which this form should not be filed, such as having already netted partnership adjustments or if the income tax return due date has not passed.

BBA Partnerships vs Non-BBA Partnerships

BBA Partnerships, or partnerships subject to the Bipartisan Budget Act, and Non-BBA Partnerships are two distinct categories with different requirements for filing an Administrative Adjustment Request (AAR).

BBA Partnerships are those formed on or after January 1, 2018, or those that have elected to be subject to the BBA partnership audit and adjustment rules. These partnerships are generally required to file AARs to report and pay any additional tax resulting from audited partnership adjustments at the partnership level.

Non-BBA Partnerships, on the other hand, are partnerships formed before January 1, 2018, that have not elected to be subject to the BBA partnership audit process. These partnerships may still need to file AARs, but the rules and procedures may differ from those applicable to BBA Partnerships.

The specific rules and requirements for filing AARs may vary depending on the partnership type. It is essential for both BBA and Non-BBA Partnerships to understand their obligations and follow the guidelines outlined by the IRS to ensure compliance with the correct procedures and reporting requirements. 

What Documentation Do I Need to File Form 8082?

You may need to file relevant tax forms to support the administrative adjustment request. The necessary documents vary depending on the specific circumstances, but here are some common ones:

  1. Schedule K-1: This form provides information on each partner’s share of income, deductions, credits, and other items. If there are discrepancies or errors in reporting on Schedule K-1, it may require correction using Form 8082.
  2. Schedule Q: This schedule is used to report certain partnership items affected by the centralized partnership audit rules. If there are inconsistencies or adjustments related to Schedule Q items, it may necessitate the filing of Form 8082.
  3. Foreign Trust Statement: If the partnership has a foreign trust as a partner and the reporting on the foreign trust statement is incorrect, it may require the use of Form 8082 to rectify the situation.

It’s important to note that if a partnership, S corporation, trust, estate, or real estate mortgage investment conduit (REMIC) has not filed a tax return or issued a Schedule K-1, Form 8082 cannot be filed. In such cases, it is advisable to address the unfiled return or the missing Schedule K-1 with the appropriate authorities.

Filing Deadline

The filing deadline for Form 8082, also known as the Administrative Adjustment Request (AAR), depends on the type of return being filed. For partnership returns (Form 1065), the AAR must be submitted no later than 3 years after the date the original return was filed or 2 years from the date the tax was paid, whichever is later.

However, there are exceptions to this filing deadline. If a Notice of Administrative Proceeding has been issued, the partnership has 270 days from the date of the notice to file the AAR. Additionally, if the partnership is under examination, it must file the AAR within 90 days of receiving a written notice from the IRS.

It is important to note that the AAR must be filed by the partnership and not by individual partners. The AAR allows partnerships to request adjustments to their previously filed income tax returns.

In summary, the deadline for filing Form 8082, the Administrative Adjustment Request, for partnership returns is typically within 3 years of the original return filing or 2 years from the tax payment date. Exceptions to this deadline exist when a Notice of Administrative Proceeding is issued or when the partnership is under examination.

What Happens When You Receive Form 8986 as a Result of an AAR

When a partnership submits an Administrative Adjustment Request (AAR) to the IRS, it triggers a series of processes and notifications. One such notification is the issuance of Form 8986 to the individual partners. Form 8986, also known as the “Partnership Adjustment Tracking Report,” is sent to the partners to inform them of the adjustments made to the partnership’s tax return as a result of the AAR.

This form outlines the specific adjustments made to the partnership’s income, deductions, credits, and other items. It provides essential information for each partner to understand how their individual tax liability may be affected by the adjustments made at the partnership level. Additionally, Form 8986 is used by the IRS to track and reconcile the adjustments made by the partnership. It is important for partners to carefully review and understand the information provided on Form 8986 and consult with a tax professional to ensure accurate reporting on their individual income tax returns.

Partnerships, S Corporations, & Pass-through Partner Entities

Partnerships, S corporations, and trusts are all examples of pass-through partner entities that differ from individuals or C corporations in various ways.

Partnerships are formed when two or more individuals or entities join together to conduct business or trade. The income and deductions of a partnership flow through to its partners, who report their share of the partnership’s income and expenses on their individual tax returns. S corporations, on the other hand, are a special type of corporation that elects to pass through its income, deductions, and credits to its shareholders. Like partnerships, the shareholders report their share of the S corporation’s income and losses on their individual tax returns.

Trusts, another type of pass-through entity, are legal arrangements where a trustee holds and manages assets for the benefit of one or more beneficiaries. In the case of a trust, the income is distributed to beneficiaries and reported on their individual tax returns, usually using Form 1041.

When these pass-through partner entities receive Form 8986, which is an Administrative Adjustment Request from the IRS, they need to take certain actions. It notifies the entity that there have been adjustments made to their originally filed income tax return.


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