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2022 Federal Income Tax Brackets, Rates, & Standard Deductions

This article gives you the tax rates and related numbers that you will need to prepare your 2022 federal income tax return. In general, 2022 personal tax returns are due by April 15, 2023.

If you are looking for 2021 tax rates, you can find them HERE.

What are tax brackets?

In April of every year, millions of Americans sit down to file their taxes. Chief among these is their income tax, which is a tax imposed by the federal and sometimes state or local governments on income generated by individuals and businesses.

However, not everyone is taxed the same. The United States has what is called a progressive income tax system, meaning the greater your income, the more you pay. Different tax brackets, or ranges of income, are taxed at different rates.

The federal tax brackets are broken down into seven (7) taxable income groups, based on your federal filing statuses (e.g. whether you are single, a head of household, married, etc).

The federal income tax rates for 2022 did not change from 2021. They are: 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37%, depending on the tax bracket.

What are the tax brackets for 2022?

The 2022 tax brackets have been changed since 2021 to adjust for inflation.It’s important to remember that moving up into a higher tax bracket does not mean that all of your income will be taxed at the higher rate. Only the money you earn within a particular bracket is subject to the corresponding tax rate. The tables below help demonstrate this concept.

For more information, see: How to Determine Your Income Tax Bracket.

Here are the tax rate brackets for each filing status:

Single/Unmarried Individuals

Taxable Income Tax Rate
$0 – $10,275 10%
$10,276 – $41,775 $1,027.50 + 12% of the amount over $10,275
$41,776 – $89,075 $4,807.50 + 22% of the amount over $41,775
$89,076 – $170,050 $15,213.50 + 24% of the amount over $89,075
$170,051 – $215,950 $34,647.50 + 32% of the amount over $170,050
$215,951 – $539,900 $49,335.50 + 35% of the amount over $215,950
$539,901 or more $162,718 + 37% of the amount over $539,900

Married Filing Jointly or Qualifying Widow/Widower

Taxable Income Tax Rate
$0 – $20,550 10%
$20,551 – $83,550 $2,055 + 12% of the amount over $20,550
$83,551 – $178,150 $9,615 + 22% of the amount over $83,550
$178,151 – $340,100 $30,427 + 24% of the amount over $178,150
$340,101 – $431,900 $69,295 + 32% of the amount over $340,100
$431,901 – $647,850 $98,671 + 35% of the amount over $431,900
$647,851 or more $174,253.50 + 37% of the amount over $647,850

Married Filing Separately

Taxable Income Tax Rate
$0 – $10,275 10%
$10,276 – $41,775 $1,027.50 + 12% of the amount over $10,275
$41,776 – $89,075 $4,807.50 + 22% of the amount over $41,775
$89,076 – $170,050 $15,213.50 + 24% of the amount over $89,075
$170,051 – $215,950 $34,647.50 + 32% of the amount over $170,050
$215,951 – $323,925 $49,335.50 + 35% of the amount over $215,950
$323,926 or more $86,127 + 37% of the amount over $323,925

Head of Household

Taxable Income Tax Rate
$0 – $14,650 10%
$14,651 – $55,900 $1,465 + 12% of the amount over $14,650
$55,901 – $89,0505 $6,415 + 22% of the amount over $55,900
$89,051 – $170,050 $13,708 + 24% of the amount over $89,050
$170,051 – $215,950 $33,148.50 + 32% of the amount over $170,050
$215,951 – $539,900 $47,836.50 + 35% of the amount over $215,950
$539,901 or more $162,218.50 + 37% of the amount over $539,900

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Calculating your 2022 tax bracket

Being “in” a certain tax bracket doesn’t mean that all your income will be taxed at that rate. As mentioned previously, the United States has a progressive tax system, meaning you get taxed more as you make more money. The following example can give you an idea of how to calculate your tax bracket.

Example 1:

You are unmarried, and you had $30,000 of taxable income in 2022. This means you are in the 12% tax bracket. But that does not mean you pay 12% on all your income. Instead, you would pay 10% on the first $10,275 (or $1,027.50) plus 12% on the remaining $19,725 (or $2,367)

In total, you would pay $3,394.5 in income tax, before deductions.

Example 2:

You are a head of household (meaning you pay more than half the costs to maintain your home and have a qualifying dependent (such as a child or relative)) and you made $70,000 of taxable income in 2022. This means you are in the 22% tax bracket. The first $14,650 of your income will be taxed at 10% (or $1,465). You would pay 12% on the chunk of income between $14,651 and $55,900 (so, $4,950). Finally, you would pay 22% on the income you made over $55,900, which comes out to $3,102.

It’s important to note that the above tables and examples are only about federal income taxes. Some states also have state income taxes, which need to be calculated separately.

NOTE: There are no personal exemption amounts for 2022

2022 Standard Deduction Amounts

Once you’ve calculated your income tax, you may wonder how to reduce your tax bill. There are two primary ways to do this: tax credits and tax deductions.

A tax credit directly reduces the tax balance that you owe. It has no impact on what tax bracket you fall into. So, if you owe $3,300 in taxes, and you are eligible for a $200 tax credit, your balance will be reduced to $3,100. You can learn more about the different types of tax credits here.

A tax deduction is an item you can subtract from your income to lower your overall taxable income. There are two main types of tax deductions: the standard deduction and itemized deductions. The IRS allows you to claim one type of tax deduction, but not both, so you should choose whichever type of deduction gives you the biggest tax reduction.

Here are the 2022 standard deduction amounts for each filing status:

Filing Status Standard Deduction Amount
Single $12,950
Married Filing Jointly or Qualifying Widow(er) $25,900
Married Filing Separately $12,950
Head of Household $19,400

There is an additional standard deduction of $1,400 for taxpayers who are over age 65 or blind. The amount of the additional standard deduction increases to $1,750 for taxpayers who are claiming the “single” or “head of household” filing status.

If you paid for any of the following items during the tax year, you may be able to use them to claim an itemized deduction:

  • Medical and dental expenses
  • Deductible taxes
  • Home mortgage points
  • Interest expenses
  • Charitable contributions
  • Business use of your home or car
  • Business travel expenses
  • Work-related education expenses
  • Casualty, disaster, and theft losses

For a more in-depth overview of tax deductions, click here.

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